Thursday, February 4, 2016

Ben Franklin Summary Response

Benjamin Franklin Summary Response
In Ben Franklin’s 1759 quote he describes that people who are willing to give up their own freedom for a small amount of safety deserve to neither have freedom nor safety. He explains how if someone is willing to give up their personal freedom or privacy for a small amount of safety, then they deserve to not have either.
In Ben Franklin’s 1759 quote he incorrectly portrays that people who are willing to give up their own freedom for a small amount of safety deserve neither because if we want to stay safe then we have to give up some privacy and if we are willing to give up privacy for safety then we should at least get safety. Franklin stated, “They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety” (Benjamin Franklin, 1759).  As a citizen of the United States I want to make sure that I am as safe as possible. If this means that I have to give up some of my privacy to ensure that I am safe, then I am willing to do so. For example, I am willing to be videotaped and on surveillance cameras if it means that the criminals are on surveillance cameras as well. I am not doing anything wrong, so I have nothing to hide being on camera. The people who are doing illegal actions will also be on camera which gives the government a better chance of being able to find these people and keep myself and others safe. Nancy La Vigne describes how video surveillance cameras help identify criminals, “The potential value of public surveillance technology took on new meaning last week when investigators identified the two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing after sifting through video images captured by the city’s cameras. This has prompted public officials like Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel to speak of the “important function” such cameras play in offering safety on a daily basis and during events both big and small” (How Surveillance Cameras Can Help Prevent and Solve Crime, Nancy G. La Vigne). La Vigne is explaining how the surveillance cameras made it so the government was able to find the criminals of the Boston Marathon shooting. She also describes that the cameras are proving to protect people more than take away their privacy so more and more people want them. If I personally want to stay safe, and think that the way to do this is to give up some freedom and privacy, then I should be allowed to do so and have some privacy as well as safety. Whoever is willing to give up freedom for safety, should get that safety for their sacrifice.
However, some people believe that the way to stay safe is not by giving up personal freedoms. If you give up freedoms such as your privacy, then what makes you deserve to be safe. We are videotaped by the government hundreds of times throughout the day. If the government can see what you are doing and where are you are going every second of the day, what makes you think that the rest of the world and criminals can’t see what you are doing. If you are willing to be surveillanced, then you are putting yourself out there to criminals, therefore you don’t deserve to be safe. Matt Rotenberg from EPIC agreed with this argument, “ In documents obtained by EPIC through the Freedom of Information Act, travelers routinely described the body scanner experience as embarrassing and humiliating. Pregnant women worry about the effects of radiation. Men and women liken the pat-downs to sexual assault” (Body scanners, pat-downs violate law and privacy, Matt Rotenberg). Rotenberg is explaining how body and security scanners violate people’s privacy. They can see things that people might not want them to see, and the make women and men feel uncomfortable. He is explaining how many people feel violated by the body scanners and how using them in places like airports is unconstitutional. Freedom is something that all people should have the right to just like privacy. Things such as being surveillanced everyday or having to go through security scans most public places that you go to are taking away your freedom and privacy. If the government gets to watch you, what makes it so everyone can’t watch you. You don’t deserve safety if you are willing to give up personal freedoms.At first glance, many people agree with Benjamin Franklin’s ideas that if someone is willing to give up their freedom or privacy to the government in order to stay safe, then they deserve neither. We cannot deny that giving your freedom and privacy up to the government, also gives it up to the rest of the world, and if you are willing to do so, then shouldn’t deserve freedom nor safety. This interpretation is helpful, but it misses the important point that in today’s society the only way to ensure that we are safe is to watch the criminals, and we don’t know who the criminals are unless we watch everyone. If the government watches some people, then they have to watch them all. I want to be and feel safe, as I am sure many people do. If being surveillanced and having to go through security is what that takes, then I am okay with it because I have nothing to hide. The only way that safety can be ensured or as close to ensured as possible is by being videotaped or having to go through security everywhere you go. And in order to catch the criminals, all people must be watched and checked. In conclusion, in Benjamin Franklin’s 1759 quote, he incorrectly portrays that people who are willing to give up their freedom for safety, deserve neither because giving up part of your freedom is the only way to stay safe in today’s society.

Sunday, October 18, 2015

Chantelle W. Othello Act 4 Summary Response Redo

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


In Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare demonstrates the superiority of genders through the men’s actions towards the women throughout the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Othello, as he shows his superiority over Desdemona. The difference of genders is portrayed when Othello slaps Desdemona in front of an entire crowd. William Shakespeare demonstrates the superiority of genders throughout Act 4 of Othello through the action of the men towards the women.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare correctly portrays the superiority of genders through how the men act toward the women and how the men address the women. Shakespeare is able to display the superiority of men over women in the 1600s. Othello shows his superiority over his wife Desdemona when he slaps her in front of an entire audience. Othello thought that Desdemona was cheating on him, so he was asking her about it. Othello supposedly knew that Desdemona was cheating and when she repeatedly lied to him, he got angry and slapped her. There was a group of people in the area listening to Othello bad talk Desdemona, and Othello slapped her in front of all of them. Othello knew he was superior to Desdemona and he would do what he wanted to her, “I am glad to see you mad” (Shakespeare 4.1.266), Desdemona replied “Why, sweet Othello” (Shakespeare 4.1.267), Othello responded “(striking her) Devil”(Shakespeare 4.1.268). Othello wasn’t hearing what he wanted to hear from Desdemona, and since he feels as if he owns Desdemona, he got angry and slapped her. Othello was treating Desdemona as more of an object than a women since he is a men, and in the 1600s gender played a big role in their social status. Men were above women and they could treat the women as bad as they wanted as long as they got their way.
However, Othello usually treats Desdemona with respect and makes sure that Desdemona is happy and safe. Normally, Othello is very kind to Desdemona just as Desdemona is to Othello. He treats her with respect and talks to her as if she is the most precious person that he has ever met. Othello loves Desdemona just as Desdemona loves Othello. He is concerned for Desdemona and will do whatever it takes to make her happy. Desdemona also does whatever it takes to make Othello happy. They have deep feelings for one another and Othello always trusted Desdemona before now. The two are equals and gender hasn’t played a role in their relationship before now. Othello normally speaks very highly of Desdemona, “...I do but say what she is! So delicate with her needle, an admirable musician- O, she will sing the savageness out of a bear! Of so high and plenteous wit and invention” (Shakespeare 4.1.205-209). Othello was describing Desdemona saying how beautiful, delicate, smart, and talented she was. They both speak very highly of each other and trust each other. The two have always treated each other as equals and never thought about one being superior over the other.
One might think that Othello and Desdemona treat each other as equals and gender doesn’t play a role in their relationship. One cannot deny that Othello does care for Desdemona and thinks very highly of her, especially when he describes her to others and describes their love for each other to others. While this view seems reasonable at first, one doesn’t take into account the fact that Othello just slapped Desdemona, and embarrassed her by doing it in front of a crowd. Othello was mad at Desdemona, and used his gender superiority to make it acceptable to slap Desdemona. He also treated her like an object because when Othello accused her of cheating on him, he didn’t give Desdemona a chance to explain herself. Othello just said what he wanted to believe, and got mad at Desdemona for a crime that she didn’t even do. Another example of this is when later Desdemona tried to talk to Othello to see why he was mad at her. She was just explaining herself and Othello shooed her off, even when she began to beg on her knees. Desdemona explains how she is faithful and is not a whore, “To whom, my lord? With whom? How am I false?” (Shakespeare 4.2.49). Othello responded, “Ah, Desdemona, away, away, away!” (Shakespeare 4.2.50). Even after Othello slaps Desdemona for doing nothing wrong, he still won’t tell her what he is mad at her for or give her time to explain. He thinks that he doesn’t owe her an explanation since he is a man. Shakespeare shows the reader that in the 1600s gender played a big role in relationships and males had superiority over females. In Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare correctly portrays, through the characters actions towards each others, how gender superiority can influence someone’s actions.


Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Chantelle W. Othello Act 4 Summary Response

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


In Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare demonstrates the superiority of genders through the men’s actions towards the women throughout the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Othello, as he shows his superiority over Desdemona. The difference of genders is portrayed when Othello slaps Desdemona in front of an entire crowd. William Shakespeare demonstrates the superiority of genders throughout Act 4 of Othello through the action of the men towards the women.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare correctly portrays the superiority of genders through how the men act toward the women and how the men address the women. Shakespeare is able to display the superiority of men over women in the 1600s. Othello shows his superiority over his wife Desdemona when he slaps her in front of an entire audience. Othello thought that Desdemona was cheating on him, so he was asking her about it. Othello supposedly knew that Desdemona was cheating and when she repeatedly lied to him, he got angry and slapped her. There was a group of people in the area listening to Othello bad talk Desdemona, and Othello slapped her in front of all of them. Othello knew he was superior to Desdemona and he would do what he wanted to her, “I am glad to see you mad” (Shakespeare 4.1.266), Desdemona replied “Why, sweet Othello” (Shakespeare 4.1.267), Othello responded “(striking her) Devil”(Shakespeare 4.1.268). Othello wasn’t hearing what he wanted to hear from Desdemona, and since he feels as if he owns Desdemona, he got angry and her and slapped her. Othello was treating Desdemona as an object since he is a men, and in the 1600s gender played a big role in their social status. Men were above women and they could treat the women as bad as they wanted as long as they got their way. Othello shows this by slapping Desdemona in public.
However, Othello usually treats Desdemona with respect and makes sure that Desdemona is happy and safe. Normally, Othello is very kind to Desdemona just as Desdemona is to Othello. He treats her kindly and talks to her as if she is the most precious person that he has ever met. Othello loves Desdemona and Desdemona loves Othello. He is concerned for Desdemona and will do whatever it takes to make her happy. Desdemona also does whatever it takes to make Othello happy. They have deep feelings for one another and Othello always trusted Desdemona before now. The two are equals and gender hasn’t played a role in their relationship before now. Othello normally speaks very highly of Desdemona, “...I do but say what she is! So delicate with her needle, an admirable musician- O, she will sing the savageness out of a bear! Of so high and plenteous wit and invention” (Shakespeare 4.1.205-209). Othello was describing Desdemona saying how beautiful, delicate, smart, and talented she was. Othello has always loved Desdemona and Desdemona has always loved Othello. They both speak very highly of each other and trust each other. Gender has never played a role in their relationship. Othello and Desdemona have always treated each other as equals and never thought about one being superior over the other.
One might think that Othello and Desdemona treat each other as equals and gender doesn’t play a role in their relationship. One cannot deny that Othello does care for Desdemona and thinks very highly of her, especially when he describes her to others and describes their love for each other to others. While this view seems reasonable at first, one doesn’t take into account the fact that Othello just slapped Desdemona, and embarrassed her by doing it in front of a crowd. Othello was made at Desdemona, and used his gender superiority to make it okay to slap Desdemona. Not only did he slap her, but he did it in front of an entire crowd. He also treated her like and object because when Othello accused her of cheating on him, he didn’t give Desdemona a chance to explain herself. Othello just said and thought what he wanted to believe, and got mad at Desdemona for a crime that she didn’t even do. Shakespeare shows the reader that in the 1600s gender played a big role in relationships and males had superiority over females. Gender superiority is the one reason why Othello slapping Desdemona didn’t make Desdemona that upset and made it understandable to the audience that saw Desdemona being slapped. Gender superiority is what made Othello do what he did and what made him think that it was okay to slap his wife. In Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare correctly portrays, through the characters actions towards each others, how gender superiority can influence someone’s actions.


Thursday, September 24, 2015

Chantelle W and Maren P "Othello Act 2" Summary Response Redo #2

Summary Response Outline
Not a Plot Summary,
There should be no opinion in a summary
No I, We, Us, You, etc...
Strong Verbs
Concise Summary
Attribute the ideas back to the author


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Summary: In act 2 of Othello, written by William Shakespeare, the author portrays the power of words through the character’s manipulation of other people in the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Iago, as he manipulates Cassio, Roderigo, and Othello. The power of words is portrayed when Iago tells Cassio to befriend Desdemona to win back his lieutenancy, which is actually part of Iago’s plan to turn Othello against both Desdemona and Cassio. William Shakespeare uses the power of words to illustrate the characters manipulation of each other.


Response: ( all reactionary with evidence)
(Make an argument)
(take a position... correctly portrays/incorrectly portrays)


  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? Use the Rebuttal Progression
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea



Response: In act 2 of Othello, by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare uses the application of the power of words to show how his characters manipulate each other. Shakespeare is able to portray how Iago talks his way into turning everyone against each other, and he is able to show how the power of words can influence the other characters. One way Shakespeare portrays the application of the power of words is, in the end of Act 2, Cassio unknowingly plays into Iago’s master plan. Iago comes up with a new plan to get the lieutenancy position after Cassio was fired from this role. Appearing to be cheering Cassio up, Iago describes a plan in which Cassio can win back his status, reputation, and job. Cassio begins to listen to Iago, but once Cassio has left, Iago reveals his real plan to the audience, “Plies Desdemona to repair his fortunes, and she for him pleads strongly to the Moor, I'll pour this pestilence into his ear, that she repels him for her body's lust. And by how much she strives to do him [Cassio] good, she shall undo her credit with the Moor. So will I turn her virtue into pitch, And out of her own goodness make the net that shall enmesh them all,” (Shakespeare 2.3. 374-382). Iago is showing how, when Cassio tries to tell his story to Desdemona, Iago will be whispering in Othello’s ear that Cassio and Desdemona are in love. Iago is using the power of words to get Cassio involved in the master plan so that Iago can take Cassio’s job.
However, Iago is sometimes actually hurting himself when he is describing to Cassio a plan to get his position back. His words of manipulation could backfire on him in this case if Othello refuses to believe that Desdemona has taken Cassio as her lover. Othello is steadfastly devoted to Desdemona, and it seems true in reverse to everyone else as well, and therefore Othello might not think that Desdemona would ever betray him. If Othello weren’t to believe Iago, then Iago’s carefully crafted plan could end up hurting himself, and end up helping Cassio back his lieutenancy. Iago explains his plan to help Cassio get back his lieutenancy, and it seems like an effective plan that will help Cassio. Iago tells Cassio, “Confess yourself freely to her [Desdemona]; importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter...,” (Shakespeare 2.3.337-345). Iago’s plan to help Cassio to get back his lieutenancy is for Cassio to befriend Desdemona, and tell her his woes, while actually getting Othello to believe that the new friendship between Desdemona and Cassio is actually a physical relationship. Iago thinks that this plan will help him to the position of Lieutenant, but in Cassio’s eyes he thinks that Iago is innocent, and genuinely trying to help him. Although Iago is manipulating Cassio, this encouragement could help Cassio, and hurt Iago in the end.
Many think that Othello would not jump to conclusions about Desdemona and Cassio because of Othello’s reputation as a person who trusts others. This would lead to the conclusion that he would trust his own wife when she denies any romantic connection to Cassio. We cannot deny that Iago’s words are uplifting and are motivating Cassio to befriend Desdemona and that Iago’s master plan could backfire on him if Othello trusts Desdemona over Iago. This interpretation is helpful, but it misses the important point that Iago is a master manipulator, and also that he will be telling Othello about the “affair” between Desdemona and Cassio, while Othello has been seeing “evidence” with his own eyes. Also, Othello at this point will have no reason to doubt Iago’s honesty. Othello is also of the opinion that Cassio is a worthless, untrustworthy knave. Shakespeare correctly portrays the power of words throughout Act 2 by using the characters to manipulate each other in a complex way.

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Chantelle W and Maren P "Othello Act 2" Summary Response Redo

Summary Response Outline
Not a Plot Summary,
There should be no opinion in a summary
No I, We, Us, You, etc...
Strong Verbs
Concise Summary
Attribute the ideas back to the author


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Summary: In act 2 of Othello, written by William Shakespeare, the author portrays the power of words through the character’s manipulation of other people in the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Iago, as he manipulates Cassio, Roderigo, and Othello. The power of words is portrayed when Iago tells Cassio to befriend Desdemona to win back his lieutenancy, which is actually part of Iago’s plan to turn Othello against both Desdemona and Cassio. William Shakespeare uses the power of words to illustrate the characters manipulation of each other.


Response: ( all reactionary with evidence)
(Make an argument)
(take a position... correctly portrays/incorrectly portrays)


  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? Use the Rebuttal Progression
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea



Response: In act 2 of Othello, by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare uses the application of the power of words to show how his characters manipulate each other. Because of the way Shakespeare portrays how Iago talks his way into turning everyone against each other, he is able to show how the power of words can influence the other characters. Another way Shakespeare portrays the application of the power of words is in the end, Iago unknowingly plays into his master plan. Iago does this when Cassio loses his lieutenancy and is devastated about it. Appearing to be trying to cheer him up, Iago describes a plan in which Cassio can win back his status, reputation, and job. He describes his plan to Cassio, but after Cassio has left, explains “Plies Desdemona to repair his fortunes, and she for him pleads strongly to the Moor, I'll pour this pestilence into his ear, that she repels him for her body's lust. And by how much she strives to do him [Cassio] good, she shall undo her credit with the Moor. So will I turn her virtue into pitch, And out of her own goodness make the net that shall enmesh them all,” (Shakespeare 2.3. 374-382). Iago is showing how, when Cassio tries to tell his story to Desdemona, Iago will be whispering in Othello’s ear that Cassio and Desdemona are in love. Iago is using the power of words to get Cassio involved in the master plan so that Iago can take Cassio’s job.
However, Iago is sometimes actually hurting himself when he is describing to Cassio a plan to get his position back. His words of manipulation could backfire on him in this case if Othello refuses to believe that Desdemona has taken Cassio as her lover. Othello is steadfastly devoted to Desdemona, and it seems true in reverse to everyone else as well, and therefore Othello might not think that Desdemona would ever betray him. If Othello weren’t to believe Iago, then Iago’s carefully crafted plan could end up hurting himself, and end up helping Cassio back to his lieutenancy. Iago explains his plan to help Cassio get back his lieutenancy, and it seems like an effective plan that will help Cassio. Iago tells Cassio, “Confess yourself freely to her [Desdemona]; importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter...,” (Shakespeare 2.3.337-345). Iago’s plan to help Cassio to get back his lieutenancy is for Cassio to befriend Desdemona, and tell her his woes, while actually getting Othello to believe that the new friendship between Desdemona and Cassio is actually a physical relationship. Iago thinks that this plan will help him to the position of Lieutenant, but in Cassio’s eyes he thinks that Iago is innocent, and genuinely trying to help him. Although Iago is manipulating Cassio, this encouragement could help Cassio, and hurt Iago in the end.
Many think that Othello would not jump to conclusions about Desdemona and Cassio because of Othello’s reputation as a person who would trusts. This would lead to the conclusion that he would trust his own wife when she denies any romantic connection to Cassio. We cannot deny that Iago’s words are uplifting and are motivating Cassio to befriend Desdemona and that Iago’s master plan could backfire on him if Othello trusts Desdemona over Iago. This interpretation is helpful, but it misses the important point that Iago is a master manipulator, and also that he will be telling Othello about the “affair” between Desdemona and Cassio, while Othello has been seeing “evidence” with his own eyes. Also, Othello at this point will have no reason to doubt Iago’s honesty, when he is also of the opinion the Cassio is a worthless, untrustworthy knave. Shakespeare correctly portrays the power of words throughout Act 2 by using the characters to manipulate each other in a complex way.