Sunday, October 18, 2015

Chantelle W. Othello Act 4 Summary Response Redo

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


In Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare demonstrates the superiority of genders through the men’s actions towards the women throughout the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Othello, as he shows his superiority over Desdemona. The difference of genders is portrayed when Othello slaps Desdemona in front of an entire crowd. William Shakespeare demonstrates the superiority of genders throughout Act 4 of Othello through the action of the men towards the women.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare correctly portrays the superiority of genders through how the men act toward the women and how the men address the women. Shakespeare is able to display the superiority of men over women in the 1600s. Othello shows his superiority over his wife Desdemona when he slaps her in front of an entire audience. Othello thought that Desdemona was cheating on him, so he was asking her about it. Othello supposedly knew that Desdemona was cheating and when she repeatedly lied to him, he got angry and slapped her. There was a group of people in the area listening to Othello bad talk Desdemona, and Othello slapped her in front of all of them. Othello knew he was superior to Desdemona and he would do what he wanted to her, “I am glad to see you mad” (Shakespeare 4.1.266), Desdemona replied “Why, sweet Othello” (Shakespeare 4.1.267), Othello responded “(striking her) Devil”(Shakespeare 4.1.268). Othello wasn’t hearing what he wanted to hear from Desdemona, and since he feels as if he owns Desdemona, he got angry and slapped her. Othello was treating Desdemona as more of an object than a women since he is a men, and in the 1600s gender played a big role in their social status. Men were above women and they could treat the women as bad as they wanted as long as they got their way.
However, Othello usually treats Desdemona with respect and makes sure that Desdemona is happy and safe. Normally, Othello is very kind to Desdemona just as Desdemona is to Othello. He treats her with respect and talks to her as if she is the most precious person that he has ever met. Othello loves Desdemona just as Desdemona loves Othello. He is concerned for Desdemona and will do whatever it takes to make her happy. Desdemona also does whatever it takes to make Othello happy. They have deep feelings for one another and Othello always trusted Desdemona before now. The two are equals and gender hasn’t played a role in their relationship before now. Othello normally speaks very highly of Desdemona, “...I do but say what she is! So delicate with her needle, an admirable musician- O, she will sing the savageness out of a bear! Of so high and plenteous wit and invention” (Shakespeare 4.1.205-209). Othello was describing Desdemona saying how beautiful, delicate, smart, and talented she was. They both speak very highly of each other and trust each other. The two have always treated each other as equals and never thought about one being superior over the other.
One might think that Othello and Desdemona treat each other as equals and gender doesn’t play a role in their relationship. One cannot deny that Othello does care for Desdemona and thinks very highly of her, especially when he describes her to others and describes their love for each other to others. While this view seems reasonable at first, one doesn’t take into account the fact that Othello just slapped Desdemona, and embarrassed her by doing it in front of a crowd. Othello was mad at Desdemona, and used his gender superiority to make it acceptable to slap Desdemona. He also treated her like an object because when Othello accused her of cheating on him, he didn’t give Desdemona a chance to explain herself. Othello just said what he wanted to believe, and got mad at Desdemona for a crime that she didn’t even do. Another example of this is when later Desdemona tried to talk to Othello to see why he was mad at her. She was just explaining herself and Othello shooed her off, even when she began to beg on her knees. Desdemona explains how she is faithful and is not a whore, “To whom, my lord? With whom? How am I false?” (Shakespeare 4.2.49). Othello responded, “Ah, Desdemona, away, away, away!” (Shakespeare 4.2.50). Even after Othello slaps Desdemona for doing nothing wrong, he still won’t tell her what he is mad at her for or give her time to explain. He thinks that he doesn’t owe her an explanation since he is a man. Shakespeare shows the reader that in the 1600s gender played a big role in relationships and males had superiority over females. In Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare correctly portrays, through the characters actions towards each others, how gender superiority can influence someone’s actions.


Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Chantelle W. Othello Act 4 Summary Response

Summary Response Outline


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


In Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare demonstrates the superiority of genders through the men’s actions towards the women throughout the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Othello, as he shows his superiority over Desdemona. The difference of genders is portrayed when Othello slaps Desdemona in front of an entire crowd. William Shakespeare demonstrates the superiority of genders throughout Act 4 of Othello through the action of the men towards the women.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare correctly portrays the superiority of genders through how the men act toward the women and how the men address the women. Shakespeare is able to display the superiority of men over women in the 1600s. Othello shows his superiority over his wife Desdemona when he slaps her in front of an entire audience. Othello thought that Desdemona was cheating on him, so he was asking her about it. Othello supposedly knew that Desdemona was cheating and when she repeatedly lied to him, he got angry and slapped her. There was a group of people in the area listening to Othello bad talk Desdemona, and Othello slapped her in front of all of them. Othello knew he was superior to Desdemona and he would do what he wanted to her, “I am glad to see you mad” (Shakespeare 4.1.266), Desdemona replied “Why, sweet Othello” (Shakespeare 4.1.267), Othello responded “(striking her) Devil”(Shakespeare 4.1.268). Othello wasn’t hearing what he wanted to hear from Desdemona, and since he feels as if he owns Desdemona, he got angry and her and slapped her. Othello was treating Desdemona as an object since he is a men, and in the 1600s gender played a big role in their social status. Men were above women and they could treat the women as bad as they wanted as long as they got their way. Othello shows this by slapping Desdemona in public.
However, Othello usually treats Desdemona with respect and makes sure that Desdemona is happy and safe. Normally, Othello is very kind to Desdemona just as Desdemona is to Othello. He treats her kindly and talks to her as if she is the most precious person that he has ever met. Othello loves Desdemona and Desdemona loves Othello. He is concerned for Desdemona and will do whatever it takes to make her happy. Desdemona also does whatever it takes to make Othello happy. They have deep feelings for one another and Othello always trusted Desdemona before now. The two are equals and gender hasn’t played a role in their relationship before now. Othello normally speaks very highly of Desdemona, “...I do but say what she is! So delicate with her needle, an admirable musician- O, she will sing the savageness out of a bear! Of so high and plenteous wit and invention” (Shakespeare 4.1.205-209). Othello was describing Desdemona saying how beautiful, delicate, smart, and talented she was. Othello has always loved Desdemona and Desdemona has always loved Othello. They both speak very highly of each other and trust each other. Gender has never played a role in their relationship. Othello and Desdemona have always treated each other as equals and never thought about one being superior over the other.
One might think that Othello and Desdemona treat each other as equals and gender doesn’t play a role in their relationship. One cannot deny that Othello does care for Desdemona and thinks very highly of her, especially when he describes her to others and describes their love for each other to others. While this view seems reasonable at first, one doesn’t take into account the fact that Othello just slapped Desdemona, and embarrassed her by doing it in front of a crowd. Othello was made at Desdemona, and used his gender superiority to make it okay to slap Desdemona. Not only did he slap her, but he did it in front of an entire crowd. He also treated her like and object because when Othello accused her of cheating on him, he didn’t give Desdemona a chance to explain herself. Othello just said and thought what he wanted to believe, and got mad at Desdemona for a crime that she didn’t even do. Shakespeare shows the reader that in the 1600s gender played a big role in relationships and males had superiority over females. Gender superiority is the one reason why Othello slapping Desdemona didn’t make Desdemona that upset and made it understandable to the audience that saw Desdemona being slapped. Gender superiority is what made Othello do what he did and what made him think that it was okay to slap his wife. In Act 4 of Othello by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare correctly portrays, through the characters actions towards each others, how gender superiority can influence someone’s actions.


Thursday, September 24, 2015

Chantelle W and Maren P "Othello Act 2" Summary Response Redo #2

Summary Response Outline
Not a Plot Summary,
There should be no opinion in a summary
No I, We, Us, You, etc...
Strong Verbs
Concise Summary
Attribute the ideas back to the author


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Summary: In act 2 of Othello, written by William Shakespeare, the author portrays the power of words through the character’s manipulation of other people in the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Iago, as he manipulates Cassio, Roderigo, and Othello. The power of words is portrayed when Iago tells Cassio to befriend Desdemona to win back his lieutenancy, which is actually part of Iago’s plan to turn Othello against both Desdemona and Cassio. William Shakespeare uses the power of words to illustrate the characters manipulation of each other.


Response: ( all reactionary with evidence)
(Make an argument)
(take a position... correctly portrays/incorrectly portrays)


  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? Use the Rebuttal Progression
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea



Response: In act 2 of Othello, by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare uses the application of the power of words to show how his characters manipulate each other. Shakespeare is able to portray how Iago talks his way into turning everyone against each other, and he is able to show how the power of words can influence the other characters. One way Shakespeare portrays the application of the power of words is, in the end of Act 2, Cassio unknowingly plays into Iago’s master plan. Iago comes up with a new plan to get the lieutenancy position after Cassio was fired from this role. Appearing to be cheering Cassio up, Iago describes a plan in which Cassio can win back his status, reputation, and job. Cassio begins to listen to Iago, but once Cassio has left, Iago reveals his real plan to the audience, “Plies Desdemona to repair his fortunes, and she for him pleads strongly to the Moor, I'll pour this pestilence into his ear, that she repels him for her body's lust. And by how much she strives to do him [Cassio] good, she shall undo her credit with the Moor. So will I turn her virtue into pitch, And out of her own goodness make the net that shall enmesh them all,” (Shakespeare 2.3. 374-382). Iago is showing how, when Cassio tries to tell his story to Desdemona, Iago will be whispering in Othello’s ear that Cassio and Desdemona are in love. Iago is using the power of words to get Cassio involved in the master plan so that Iago can take Cassio’s job.
However, Iago is sometimes actually hurting himself when he is describing to Cassio a plan to get his position back. His words of manipulation could backfire on him in this case if Othello refuses to believe that Desdemona has taken Cassio as her lover. Othello is steadfastly devoted to Desdemona, and it seems true in reverse to everyone else as well, and therefore Othello might not think that Desdemona would ever betray him. If Othello weren’t to believe Iago, then Iago’s carefully crafted plan could end up hurting himself, and end up helping Cassio back his lieutenancy. Iago explains his plan to help Cassio get back his lieutenancy, and it seems like an effective plan that will help Cassio. Iago tells Cassio, “Confess yourself freely to her [Desdemona]; importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter...,” (Shakespeare 2.3.337-345). Iago’s plan to help Cassio to get back his lieutenancy is for Cassio to befriend Desdemona, and tell her his woes, while actually getting Othello to believe that the new friendship between Desdemona and Cassio is actually a physical relationship. Iago thinks that this plan will help him to the position of Lieutenant, but in Cassio’s eyes he thinks that Iago is innocent, and genuinely trying to help him. Although Iago is manipulating Cassio, this encouragement could help Cassio, and hurt Iago in the end.
Many think that Othello would not jump to conclusions about Desdemona and Cassio because of Othello’s reputation as a person who trusts others. This would lead to the conclusion that he would trust his own wife when she denies any romantic connection to Cassio. We cannot deny that Iago’s words are uplifting and are motivating Cassio to befriend Desdemona and that Iago’s master plan could backfire on him if Othello trusts Desdemona over Iago. This interpretation is helpful, but it misses the important point that Iago is a master manipulator, and also that he will be telling Othello about the “affair” between Desdemona and Cassio, while Othello has been seeing “evidence” with his own eyes. Also, Othello at this point will have no reason to doubt Iago’s honesty. Othello is also of the opinion that Cassio is a worthless, untrustworthy knave. Shakespeare correctly portrays the power of words throughout Act 2 by using the characters to manipulate each other in a complex way.

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Chantelle W and Maren P "Othello Act 2" Summary Response Redo

Summary Response Outline
Not a Plot Summary,
There should be no opinion in a summary
No I, We, Us, You, etc...
Strong Verbs
Concise Summary
Attribute the ideas back to the author


Summary:
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea


Summary: In act 2 of Othello, written by William Shakespeare, the author portrays the power of words through the character’s manipulation of other people in the text. Shakespeare does this through characters such as Iago, as he manipulates Cassio, Roderigo, and Othello. The power of words is portrayed when Iago tells Cassio to befriend Desdemona to win back his lieutenancy, which is actually part of Iago’s plan to turn Othello against both Desdemona and Cassio. William Shakespeare uses the power of words to illustrate the characters manipulation of each other.


Response: ( all reactionary with evidence)
(Make an argument)
(take a position... correctly portrays/incorrectly portrays)


  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays), because ___________ and ______________
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “                  .” ( 1 )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 1: However, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument? Use the Rebuttal Progression
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea



Response: In act 2 of Othello, by William Shakespeare, Shakespeare uses the application of the power of words to show how his characters manipulate each other. Because of the way Shakespeare portrays how Iago talks his way into turning everyone against each other, he is able to show how the power of words can influence the other characters. Another way Shakespeare portrays the application of the power of words is in the end, Iago unknowingly plays into his master plan. Iago does this when Cassio loses his lieutenancy and is devastated about it. Appearing to be trying to cheer him up, Iago describes a plan in which Cassio can win back his status, reputation, and job. He describes his plan to Cassio, but after Cassio has left, explains “Plies Desdemona to repair his fortunes, and she for him pleads strongly to the Moor, I'll pour this pestilence into his ear, that she repels him for her body's lust. And by how much she strives to do him [Cassio] good, she shall undo her credit with the Moor. So will I turn her virtue into pitch, And out of her own goodness make the net that shall enmesh them all,” (Shakespeare 2.3. 374-382). Iago is showing how, when Cassio tries to tell his story to Desdemona, Iago will be whispering in Othello’s ear that Cassio and Desdemona are in love. Iago is using the power of words to get Cassio involved in the master plan so that Iago can take Cassio’s job.
However, Iago is sometimes actually hurting himself when he is describing to Cassio a plan to get his position back. His words of manipulation could backfire on him in this case if Othello refuses to believe that Desdemona has taken Cassio as her lover. Othello is steadfastly devoted to Desdemona, and it seems true in reverse to everyone else as well, and therefore Othello might not think that Desdemona would ever betray him. If Othello weren’t to believe Iago, then Iago’s carefully crafted plan could end up hurting himself, and end up helping Cassio back to his lieutenancy. Iago explains his plan to help Cassio get back his lieutenancy, and it seems like an effective plan that will help Cassio. Iago tells Cassio, “Confess yourself freely to her [Desdemona]; importune her help to put you in your place again. She is of so free, so kind, so apt, so blessed a disposition, she holds it a vice in her goodness not to do more than she is requested. This broken joint between you and her husband entreat her to splinter...,” (Shakespeare 2.3.337-345). Iago’s plan to help Cassio to get back his lieutenancy is for Cassio to befriend Desdemona, and tell her his woes, while actually getting Othello to believe that the new friendship between Desdemona and Cassio is actually a physical relationship. Iago thinks that this plan will help him to the position of Lieutenant, but in Cassio’s eyes he thinks that Iago is innocent, and genuinely trying to help him. Although Iago is manipulating Cassio, this encouragement could help Cassio, and hurt Iago in the end.
Many think that Othello would not jump to conclusions about Desdemona and Cassio because of Othello’s reputation as a person who would trusts. This would lead to the conclusion that he would trust his own wife when she denies any romantic connection to Cassio. We cannot deny that Iago’s words are uplifting and are motivating Cassio to befriend Desdemona and that Iago’s master plan could backfire on him if Othello trusts Desdemona over Iago. This interpretation is helpful, but it misses the important point that Iago is a master manipulator, and also that he will be telling Othello about the “affair” between Desdemona and Cassio, while Othello has been seeing “evidence” with his own eyes. Also, Othello at this point will have no reason to doubt Iago’s honesty, when he is also of the opinion the Cassio is a worthless, untrustworthy knave. Shakespeare correctly portrays the power of words throughout Act 2 by using the characters to manipulate each other in a complex way.

Chantelle W and Riley T Bully Summary Response Redo

Summary Response Outline


Summary: No opinion- stick to the facts. No personal words (I, you, we, my, me, our, us, your)
  • Topic sentence: title, author, strong verb, main idea
Bully by Lee Hirsch tells how physical and verbal abuse from bullies scars one’s life.
  • Supporting ideas to prove main ideas
Due to living in a nightmare that they cannot escape, bullied teens try to eliminate the abuse in any way that they can, even by ending their own life.
  • Explanation of ideas
  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
Clearly Hirsch presents a modern society problem that is scarring today’s youth and those closest to them.


Response:
  • Topic sentence: title Bully, author Lee Hirsch, strong verb, agree/disagree (correctly portrays/ incorrectly portrays)how bullying scars one’s life, because it can lead teens to self- harm and even suicide___________ and ______________: Bully by Lee Hirsch correctly portrays how bullying scars one’s life because it can lead teens to self-harm and even suicide.
  • Claim 1:
    • Set-up- In Murray County, Georgia, the community is trying to take a stand as bullying becomes a problem in their local schools, but the school board is claiming that they are doing everything they can to solve the problem.  
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (“,You are rich, respected, admired, beloved; you are happy, as once I was. No answer. I called again-    )
David Long, the father of Tyler Long who committed suicide, tells of his experiences with the school board, “There were numerous times that I had to leave work for situations that arose because of Tyler being bullied. Their attitude was we can’t stop kids from saying bad things”(Hirsch).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
The school staff tried to avoid being blamed for not doing anything about the bullying. When Tyler was beaten up by two kids, the school resources officer refused to press charges against the boys. Due to the lack of effort to stop the bullying, Tyler took his own life. The constant tormenting and humiliation was too much for Tyler to handle. The bullying damaged him to a point that he thought that there was no other option than to kill himself. Not only did the bullying affect Tyler’s life, but it also affected his family. No parent should ever have to go through their own child being bullied.
  • Counterclaim 1:
    • Set-up: However, in some cases of bullying, it can just be a few boys joking around, being childish and immature. Sometimes the children think they are being funny and joking around, but they are actually hurting someone. Adults can’t always control these things.
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation”
    One school staff member explains how children are sometimes insensitive to others and are not able to be controlled at all times. A teacher states that, “Kids will be kids, boys will be boys, they’re just cruel at this age” (Hirsch).
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
Teenage boys experience peer pressure everyday. If one person is bullying a kid, it sets off a chain reaction. Many boys don’t even know about the pain they are causing until it is too late. But this bullying is still causing many kids to harm themselves, even if the bullying wasn’t intentional.



  • Claim 2:
    • Set-up-
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove claim
  • Counterclaim 2: Although, ....
    • Set-up
    • Evidence: Lead-in  “ quotation” (       )
    • Explanation of quotation to prove counterclaim
  • What are the strengths/ flaws of this argument?
A common view is that bullying is just children messing around with each other. We cannot deny that some kinds of bullying aren’t intentional. Sometimes it is a joke for everyone involved. However, when the bullying is serious, it creates a traumatizing experience for the bullied. When a child is being bullied, they begin to believe the things they are being called. Some bullies believe that they aren’t a bully because they are not physically hurting the victim, but those words are still affecting the victim. This kind of bullying is verbal abuse, and can sometimes be more hurtful than physical abuse. From being beat up,to cyberbullying, and verbal abuse, bullying is a problem everywhere, and it won’t go away until people take a stand against it.   


  • Concluding sentence: restate main idea
Even if it might not seem like it, bullying affects children in many different ways. Bullying doesn’t just affect the child, but it affects everyone around them. Not only physical abuse affects them, but words hurt too, and can sometimes due more damage than physical abuse. Clearly, in the movie Bully Hirsch is able to show how verbal and physically abuse can dramatically affect one’s life.